Interview: Peter Scott

January 11, 2019Media Coverage

Peter Scott, Untitled (Interior With Viewing Panel), 2018, ink-jet print on clear adhesive vinyl, 40 x 70 1/2″. Installation view, the Suburban, Milwaukee.

The artist, writer, and curator Peter Scott continues his manifold explorations of urbanism and its relationship to representation and perception, as most recently staged in his shows at the Emily Harvey Foundation and Magenta Plains gallery, as well as his curatorial projects at his nonprofit Carriage Trade. An exhibition of his newest work, “Future City,” a perplexing play on fiction and authenticity, is on view at the Suburban in Milwaukee through February 10, 2019.

I PARTICIPATED in Front International in Cleveland last summer, and its curator Michelle Grabner then invited me to do a show at the Suburban in Milwaukee. Given my interest in urbanism, locality, and media, the Suburban seemed like an ideal site to do a project in. I think the venue’s name refers in a sort of ironic way to the contemporary condition of urbanism, which is an increasingly homogeneous one. The building has both a picture window and a mansard roof. It’s a pastiche of architectural styles that also has the feel of a home, with shutters and a pitched roof. 

The work that led to “Future City” was a series of photographs, included in my “Arcadias” show last spring at Magenta Plains, that document life-size banner ads showing rendered interiors at luxury-condo construction sites around New York. I cropped these images in a way that makes the fiction of the ad look more real than its surroundings. You can see glimpses of the construction sites in my pictures, but the frame is mostly filled with the illusion of the ad itself. This confusion between the real and the fake expressed a disorientation that I felt in Williamsburg post–Bloomberg rezoning, when the neighborhood shifted dramatically. In some ways, you almost didn’t know where you were. You’d have to double-check that the place where you planned to meet someone still existed before going out, or you might find when you got there that it had been displaced by one of the many franchise stores that started to appear in the neighborhood.

Read the full article.

Watch & Listen: THEME SONG FOR CLEVELAND AND AKRON now online

January 7, 2019General

THEME SONG FOR CLEVELAND AND AKRON by Jonn Herschend and Silas Hite  Because Cleveland can’t have too many theme songs…The “Theme Song for Cleveland and Akron” was commissioned by FRONT International for the 2018 Cleveland Triennial. Made in collaboration with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the citizens of Northeast Ohio, the lyrics were […]

Prem Krishnamurthy and Tina Kukielski named Co-Artistic Directors for 2021 edition of FRONT International

January 4, 2019Featured, Press Releases

Download the full Press Release. CLEVELAND, January 4, 2019 – Prem Krishnamurthy and Tina Kukielski have been named Co-Artistic Directors for the second edition of FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art, which will run from July 17 through October 2, 2021. FRONT is a contemporary art triennial based in Northeast Ohio that is a […]

Explore FRONT International 2018

January 2, 2019Featured, General

An American City

July 14 – September 30, 2018

FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art launched its inaugural edition in July of 2018. An American City: Eleven Cultural Exercises, in collaboration with museums, civic institutions, and alternative spaces across Cleveland, Akron, and Oberlin, showcases an ambitious roster of projects, including performance and theater throughout the landscape and built environment. With a roster of national, international and area-based artists at all points in their career, FRONT 2018 examines the ever-changing and politically urgent conditions of an American city.

This citywide art program brings together international, national and regional artists, curators and scholars to propose a new format for biennials and triennials. It focuses on process, research, collaboration and long-term engagement with Cleveland and Northeast Ohio to provide an expansive stage to create and share new work that is inspired by and engaged with the social, political, cultural, ecological, and economic issues of our time. These themes and ideas are explored by the participants will revolve around the history and the current realities of Cleveland that serves as an example of a midsize American city in time during which this country is deeply divided.

FRONT sees museums and exhibitions as places for a nuanced conversation about the difficult issues and concerns in society, away from the perhaps comforting but also reductive way of absolute thinking that is so destructive. The program feels the need to address complexities and diversity of thought within the spectrum of institutions that address the state of the world around us.

Click to Explore FRONT International 2018: An American City: Eleven Cultural Exercises.

 

 

 

Image Credits

  1. Martine Syms. Installation view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland, FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art. Courtesy of the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York. Photography by Field Studio. 
  2. Yinka Shonibare MBE, “The American Library,” 2018. Installation view at The Cleveland Public Library. © Yinka Shonibare MBE. Commissioned by FRONT International. Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York. Photoraphy by Field Studio.
  3. Julie Ezelle-Patton, “Let it Bee Ark Hive,” 2018. Installation view. Photography by Field Studio.
  4. Candice Breitz, “Love Story,” 2016. Installation view at Playhouse Square. Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne), Outset Germany + Medienboard Berlin- Brandenburg. Photography by Field Studio.
  5. Barbara Bloom, “THE RENDERING (H X W X D =),” 2018. Installation view at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College. Commissioned by FRONT International. Courtesy of the artist and David Lewis, New York. Photography by Field Studio.   
  6. Philip Vanderhyden, “Volatility Smile 3,” 2018. Installation view at Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. Commissioned by FRONT International. Photography by Field Studio.
  7. Ad Minoliti, “Modular shelter: kitty, alien, piggy, robot, bird, fish,” 2018, courtesy of the artist and Galería Agustina Ferreyra, Mexico City and Li Jinghu, “White Clouds,” 2009, Courtesy of the artist and Magician Space. Installation view at Akron Art Museum. Photography by Field Studio.
  8. Cui Jie, “Dalian Telecom Hub Building #3,” 2017. Installation view at the Richard D. Baron ’64 Art Gallery, Oberlin College. Courtesy the artist and Antenna Space, Shanghai. Photography by Field Studio.
  9. Juan Capistrán, “…they won’t say: the times were dark/Rather: why were their poets silent?,” 2018. Commissioned by FRONT International. Photography by Field Studio.
  10. Kay Rosen, “DIVISIBILITY,” 2018. Commissioned by FRONT International. © Kay Rosen DIVISIBILITY 2018. Photography by Field Studio.
  11. Virginia Overton, “Untitled (Black Diamond),” 2018. Installation view at University Hospitals. Courtesy of the artist and Bortolami, New York. Photography by Field Studio.
  12. Guillaume Leblon and Thomas Boutoux, “Busy Time,” 2018.  Installation view at Vista Color Building. Commissioned by FRONT International. Photography by Field Studio.
  13. Marlon de Azambuja, “Brutalismo-Cleveland,” 2018. Installation view at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Courtesy of the artist and the gallery Instituto de Visión and Commissioned by FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art. Photo © The Cleveland Museum of Art.

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